climate change

AP file photo

Data from the U.S. Department of Energy shows a dramatic plunge in gasoline use as people follow health recommendations to stay home during the coronavirus pandemic. Kevin Gurney of Northern Arizona University is tracking the data daily. He says it reveals the financial upheaval caused by the pandemic, but also could hold lessons for how to act on climate change. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny spoke with Kevin Gurney about his findings.


U.S. Drought Monitor

In 2018 the Four Corners region suffered from an “exceptional” drought—the highest rating on the U.S. Drought Monitor’s scale. Water sources dried up and crops died, costing the U.S. economy 3 billion dollars. Scientists are now able to pinpoint how much of that drought was the result of climate change. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny spoke with Emily Williams of the University of California-Santa Barbara, the lead author of the study.


Josh Langdon/Kachina Peaks Avalanche Center

When a warm storm front moves over a snow-capped mountain range, floods often follow. These events aren’t common on the Colorado Plateau, where winter precipitation usually falls as snow. But scientists say that’s going to change as the world continues to heat up. 


Melissa Sevigny

A new paper published today in Science shows a rising risk of water shortages in the Colorado River Basin. Scientists say diminishing snowpack from climate change plays a critical role—not just because snow supplies the river with water, but because it acts as a protective shield against evaporation. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny spoke with lead author Chris Milly of the U.S. Geological Survey.

Melissa Sevigny: Your study was about what’s going to happen to the Colorado River as the world continues to get warmer. What did you find out?

Arizona Legislation Would Block Natural Gas Bans

Feb 14, 2020
tvo.org

The state senate has joined the House in approving a measure barring cities and counties from banning new natural gas hookups.

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