Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls

Karen Ducey/Getty Images/via NPR

Native communities experience very high rates of missing and murdered people, especially women and girls. KNAU’s Ryan Heinsius reports, a bipartisan bill in the U.S. Senate would enhance law enforcement coordination and resources in Indian Country.


Architect of the Capitol

A key congressional committee is holding a hearing on a slate of legislation aimed at addressing the deaths and disappearances of Native American women.

Courtesy

Gov. Doug Ducey this week signed a bill to commission a task force to study the high rates of missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls in Arizona. The state has the third highest rate in the nation, but the epidemic remains under-researched and the full scope of the problem isn’t clear. Tribal communities have taken matters into their own hands in recent years with aggressive social media campaigns to find missing relatives. KNAU’s Ryan Heinsius spoke with advocate and Navajo Nation Council Delegate Amber Kanazbah Crotty.


Debbie Nez Manuel via AP

Debbie Nez-Manuel was 3 years old when her mother disappeared from their home on the Navajo Nation. She turned up dead a few weeks later about an hour's drive away in Gallup, New Mexico.

Jenni Monet/PBS News Hour

Arizona has the third highest number of missing and murdered indigenous women and girls in the U.S. A bill in the state legislature would commission a first-of-its kind study to show the causes and possible solutions to the epidemic. KNAU’s Ryan Heinsius reports.