Navajo

Adrian Lerma/NPR

There are now more than 900 confirmed cases of COVID-19 on the Navajo Nation. Government officials have instituted curfews and travel bans in an effort to slow the spread. But communicating about the disease to tribal members can be challenging. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny spoke with Navajo Nation council delegate Nathaniel Brown about cultural taboos and other barriers to public health messages.


Coconino County Sheriff's Office

Authorities in northern Arizona have arrested a man for writing a racist social media post accusing Navajo people of carrying the coronavirus and calling for their deaths.

Deidra Peaches, Courtesy of Grand Canyon Trust

A new website tells stories from five Native leaders about their cultural and spiritual ties to the Grand Canyon. The images, videos, and audio clips gathered on the site are part of a larger effort to improve education about the Grand Canyon’s indigenous history. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny spoke about the project with Sarana Riggs, program manager at the nonprofit Grand Canyon Trust. 


Madeline McGill/Rural Utah Project

Many homes on the Navajo Nation don’t have street addresses, which can cause problems for voter registration and emergency services. That’s starting to change thanks to a first-of-its-kind partnership between the nonprofit Rural Utah Project and Google. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports.

Deidra Peaches, Change Labs

A new app connects shoppers with more than 500 Native-owned businesses in the Southwest, from beauty salons to food carts to car repair shops. It’s called “Rez Rising” and it’s designed to give tourists access to authentic products and experiences on tribal lands, while giving a boost to local economies. One of its creators is Heather Fleming, executive director of Change Labs, a nonprofit incubators for Native businesses. She spoke with KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny about the vision behind Rez Rising.

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