Fossil Creek

Coconino National Forest

Coconino National Forest officials say Fossil Creek recreation area will remain closed at least through the rest of the year because of post-fire hazards.

Coconino National Forest

6 p.m. UPDATE: The Gila County Sheriff's Office has issued evacuation orders for the comunities of Pine, Strawberry and Hunts Ranch as the fire has moved across Fossil Creek. An evacuation center has been opened at Rim Country Middle School. State Route 260 has been closed between Camp Verde and SR 87. 

A wildfire reported Wednesday night near Fossil Creek has grown to 6,000 acres with no containment. The blaze forced the evacuation of campers but officials say it isn’t currently threatening any local communities. KNAU’s Ryan Heinsius reports.


A new wildfire was reported late Wednesday night about 12 miles west of Strawberry. The Coconino National Forest reports the Backbone Fire is burning near the old Child’s power plant.

It’s Thursday, June 17. Forecasters reported record-high temperatures in seven northern Arizona communities on Wednesday.

Yesterday’s high of 92° in Flagstaff tied with a record high of 92° in 1940. Winslow hit a high of 107°, breaking a 1940 record of 102 degrees. And the Tuzigoot National Monument near Clarkdale reached a high of 116°, surpassing the previous record high of 108° in 2017.

Coconino County Sheriff's Office

An injured Phoenix man was rescued in the Fossil Creek Wilderness area last weekend after a canyoneering accident.

Coconino National Forest

The U.S. Forest Service has released a long-awaited management plan for Fossil Creek in central Arizona, a popular recreation site which is home to many rare and threatened species. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports.


USFS/Flickr

Coconino National Forest officials say Fossil Creek will open at half of its capacity through July.

Judi Rochford

Forensic scientists (at least on TV shows) collect DNA to figure out who was at the scene of a crime. What if you could use the same technique to discover when a mountain lion crossed a river or what kind of fish live in a lake? A team at Embry Riddle Aeronautical University in Prescott is working on that idea as a new, faster way to survey wildlife. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports.

Chirag A. Patel / Arizona Highways

The public is sending mixed messages to the U.S. Forest Service about the future of a popular but primitive recreation area in central Arizona.

U.S. Forest Service, Coconino National Forest

Scientists at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University in Prescott are working on a new way to survey wildlife—by collecting DNA from streams and rivers. It’s less expensive and less stressful to animals than traditional survey methods. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports.


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