Fossil Creek

Judi Rochford

Forensic scientists (at least on TV shows) collect DNA to figure out who was at the scene of a crime. What if you could use the same technique to discover when a mountain lion crossed a river or what kind of fish live in a lake? A team at Embry Riddle Aeronautical University in Prescott is working on that idea as a new, faster way to survey wildlife. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports.

Chirag A. Patel / Arizona Highways

The public is sending mixed messages to the U.S. Forest Service about the future of a popular but primitive recreation area in central Arizona.

U.S. Forest Service, Coconino National Forest

Scientists at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University in Prescott are working on a new way to survey wildlife—by collecting DNA from streams and rivers. It’s less expensive and less stressful to animals than traditional survey methods. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports.


Melissa Sevigny

The U.S. Forest Service wants the public to comment on a new management plan for Fossil Creek in central Arizona. But three public meetings were cancelled due to the federal shutdown. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports.


Melissa Sevigny

The U.S. Forest Service has invited the public to comment on a proposed plan to manage visitor access to Fossil Creek. It’s meant to protect the unique ecology of the popular swimming spot.

Pages